Posts Tagged ‘women’s rights’

Tension is high over Initiative 26 (the Personhood Amendment) in Mississippi. Voters will cast their votes for or against this controversial amendment on Nov. 8.

If passed, the Mississippi Constitution will be amended to “define the word ‘person’ or ‘persons’ […] to include every human being from the moment of fertilization, cloning or the functional equivalent thereof.” Irin Carmon cited the ban on “common forms of birth control” as one of the potential effects of this amendment in her article for the online news site Salon.com.

An attack on the pill is not an attack on abortion, it’s an attack on a woman’s right to choose when she wants to have a child.  The claim by the Personhood movement of extremist pro-lifers is that the prevention of any eggs from being fertilized at all is equivalent to abortion.

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New Afghan Law: Husbands are Legally Allowed to Rape Wives

Posted: April 9, 2009 by krystieyandoli in Uncategorized
Tags: , , ,
Veiled Women of Afghanistan

Veiled Women of Afghanistan

Here’s a real life example of a serious FML moment: Afghanistan just passed legislation stating that men can rape their wives. Unfortunately, this is true, and the world we live in is still under the impression that women aren’t qualified enough to have their human rights protected. FML, FML, FML! (Sadly, this statement can be taken literally.)

This law obviously sabotages progress made in the women’s rights division after the fall of the Taliban’s regime. Its intention is to “regulate family life inside Afghanistan’s Shiite community.” It doesn’t affect Afghan Sunnis.

Article 132 of the law says, “As long as the husband is not traveling, he has the right to have sexual intercourse with his wife every fourth night. Unless the wife is ill or has any kind of illness that intercourse could aggravate, the wife is bound to give a positive response to the sexual desires of her husband.” (more…)

In the spirit of women’s history month I’m going to discuss one more throwback issue: The National Equal Rights Party of 1884. Ever heard of it? Yeah, me neither. That is, until my history of women’s suffrage class this semester. Apparently Geraldine Ferraro, Hillary Clinton, and Sarah Palin weren’t the first females to be taken seriously in a U.S. Presidential election.

This was the first woman to run for U.S. president...

This was the first woman to run for U.S. president...

M.J. Gage, Lizzy Stanton, and Suzie Anthony all supported this party, as did the rest of the suffragists. Presidential candidate Belva A. Lockwood and Vice Presidential candidate Marietta Stow were involved in the first serious national campaign that included women.

It bothers me that I was 19-years-old when I learned this crucial part of American history. It bothers me that it’s not public knowledge and universally known. I wish I was wrong, and I wish more people were aware of this historical moment, but they’re not. I’d like to know why this is something conveniently left out of mainstream curriculum?

I am especially perturbed that this valuable piece of information was not brought to my attention, or anyone else’s for that matter, during the Presidential election of 2008. There was a truckload of buzz about Clinton and Palin being the first serious potential female candidates to be elected into the White House. This lack of news credibility thanks to the media only furthered this political myth. Yet again, the media played a role in shaping our thoughts and ideas on a critical issue. (more…)


The Iranian women’s rights movement has been a long time coming and is finally a serious matter of consideration. Feminists and activists worldwide are all rallying behind the women of Iran to support and encourage their newfound liberal behavior.

The real question is how to address an always-touchy issue of women’s rights in the Middle Eastern culture when trying to create progress while respecting Iran’s strict cultural traditions at the same time. It makes for quite a sticky situation when cultural and legal restrictions are all in the same.

That being said, however, the Iranian government has been violating the basic human rights of their women for as far back as history allows us to go. It is not fair to these women to have to fight for education, marital, and sexual freedom.

It is clearly evident that education plays a significant role in the women of Iran filing for divorces and battling for custody of their own children in a country where this shunned. Iranian women of all social classes are using tools like universities, satellite television, and the Internet to gain more knowledge concerning their potential equality with men. (more…)