Posts Tagged ‘superficial’

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Fashion is often criticized for its lack of diversitywhether it be on the runways or off. That reputation is well-earned when considering the absence of people of non-European descent in the industry. Models are often an easy way to gauge race representation simply because the backgrounds and origins of the models are known and it is easily quantitative.

Considering the end of the year is approaching, every industry attempts to quantify its successes, failures and advances. In fashion, those lists consider the best looks of the year, the most notable moments, the best and worst trends, emerging talents and controversies. Recently, while stumbling upon one of these lists on Fashionista, the topic was diversity among Vogue cover models.

According to the site, “22 percent of Vogue cover subjects were non-white,” which only points to the fact that the other 78 percent were occupied by white models. And it gets worse: amongst the 22 percent, the majority were of non-European or American Vogue editions. Therefore, most non-white cover models were featured on their country’s editions of Vogue (India, China, Taiwan, etc.). Great.

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After being on campus for only a couple months, it is clear to me, a freshman, who runs Syracuse University. But, then again, it’d be just as clear to a detached and completely uninterested bystander because it’s that obnoxiously apparent. It’s not the world-class professors, the generous alumni, the smarty-pants Newhouse students, or even the famous Division I athletes. Instead, it’s the “sisters” and “brothers” of the school.

Those who participate in Greek life here at Syracuse are at the top of the totem pole, and they are not discrete in proving this. Walking through the SU campus is like taking a lap around the “It’s a Small World After All” Disneyland ride, our student body is just that diverse. There is, however, one thread of commonality that’s visible on the ‘Cuse campus–an aspect of college culture, made obvious by its loyal society members: letters.

Big, flashy, printed, sneering letters–in Greek, of course. These letters of the Ancient Greek alphabet are used to mark the dozens of different fraternities and sororities here in the 315, and are seemingly everywhere on campus. They are staring you in the face as you make your way to class or grab a bite to eat, a brutal, stuck-up and unfair reminder that whoever has those letters plastered on his or her chest is part of an elite association that you are not a part of.

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