Posts Tagged ‘social media’

I recently moved to Washington, DC for the summer. Before I even arrived to the city, I was on the phone giving out my personal information to the company I’m renting my apartment from, the people who provide internet, the electricity dudes, the moving company, yada, yada yada. Name, phone number, occupation,  address, permanent address, credit card number, even my social. On top of that, Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, all my saved passwords on my laptop, my info on my iPhone, and more yada yada yada. I’m quite a careful person when it comes to this stuff, but I feel uncomfortable… And I have reason to be.

Last week, LinkedIn, the professional social network, was hacked. Over six million accounts were accessed and passwords were stolen. The passwords were very lightly encrypted and actually stored in the databases as simple text files. Once retrieved, millions of passwords were casually posted on a Russian blog.

According to NYT article on the matter, companies are constantly being attacked, sometimes successfully – large companies such as Lastfm.com, eHarmony, and others, have all been jeopardized. The surprising thing in this case was how poor LinkedIn’s password protection services were. Experts say that LinkedIn would be given a letter grade “D” for it’s security, which is absolutely appalling. Being one of the biggest social networks, such carelessness is unacceptable.

Hackers can create codes that scan up to a million password combinations a second. It is up to the companies to hire the right kind of security and keep their users feeling safe, cyber-ly safe, that is. One of the worst things about such a situation, especially with this kind of a website, is how helpless users are. For the most part, everyone remains quite, simply changes a password, and continues to keep a lot of their personal and professional information for the public to see.

If you’re hearing this news for the first time, and you have a LinkedIn account, just go ahead, change your password, and feel a little safer until the next attack comes along. In my case, and I’m sure in almost all your cases, LinkedIn is one of dozens of websites where I have an account… I can’t help but feel helpless and just hope for the best.

-Can Cakmak

Wired first published an article about the standoff between Mexican drug cartel Zetas and notorious hacking group Anonymous on Oct. 30, which escalated when the Zetas kidnapped a member of Anonymous. It then published additional information the following day that “Anonymous Mexico has reportedly cancelled attacks on the Zetas.”

Despite the update, I think an important aspect to note from both the article and sequential update is the power of social media and the Internet today. The controversy began when an Anonymous spokesperson uploaded a video on Oct. 6 stating that it would “reveal the photos, names and addresses of Zetas-affiliated cops and taxi drivers,” if the Zetas did not “release one of the group’s members.” The hacker collective “followed up its threat to the Zetas by defacing the website of former Tabasco state prosecutor Gustavo Rosario Torres” a few weeks later, denouncing him as a Zeta.”

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Spotify, YouTube, Pandora, and now SoundCloud.  It’s evident that, nowadays, playing music on iTunes is people’s last resort when looking for new jams.  I have recently found a new love for SoundCloud.  I’ve known about the website for some time (as you can tell from previous posts), but had never really used it up until recently.  One thing I’ve found is that SoundCloud is the haven of techno and house remixes.  So, obviously, I love it.

SoundCloud allows users to digitally stream tracks they upload and then share them with the online community.  These tracks can simply be copies of already released tracks, or in most cases, have the user’s original spin on the track.  This can mean the song is either remixed or covered.  SoundCloud is basically YouTube minus the videos.  But, there are so many more exciting features to the website.

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For most Syracuse stylistas, the unofficial leggings, Uggs and Northface uniform is not a very appealing wardrobe option. Fortunately, Some Girls boutique provides alternatives for those not interested in bumming it to class. Conveniently located on Marshall Street, Some Girls is a cute, edgy and unique clothing store. The walls are littered with accessories from the Snooki sunglasses to the Nicki Minaj Barbie chain, while trendy heels are displayed and flirty dresses and printed tops fill up the color-coded racks. Whether it’s classic and girly or bold and modern, there’s something for everyone despite your style preference.

Some Girls is definitely adjusting to the times, with a very active social media presence. The store’s Facebook and Twitter are constantly updated with news about the store’s recent sales and arrivals. The boutique’s website even allows you to order clothes online! I sat down with Some Girls intern, Priscilla Dominguez, and employee, Steph Curtis, to get the inside scoop on the chic boutique.

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Even though SU alum Dennis Crowley founded Foursquare and SU was found to be one of the most active schools on Twitter, Syracuse has now ranked among the ten least social cities in the United States. NetProspex, a sales and marketing company, calculated the social media presence of cities throughout the country. The Salt City claimed the title of No. 8 “least social cities,” while Anchorage, AK took the top spot.

Many students in the Syracuse area are on Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter, but NetProspex only included those who use a corporate email. It seems that many people were left out in the calculations. It’s worth noting that many of the cities on the least social list are in obscure places. Also, the majority of the most social cities are on the West Coast.

Want to see the full list, click here. Do you think Syracuse deserved to land on the least social list?

-Nicole Fisher

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Out in central Pennsylvania, a university the size of South Campus just wrapped up a week-long, campus-wide black out of all major social networking sites.

Harrisburg University Provost Eric Darr explains that the ban was meant to be an exercise for students to “think critically about the prevalence of social media.” Evidently, it worked.

Students found that not having to obsess over their Facebook, Twitter, and Tumblr accounts allowed them to focus on what they pay for – their education.

Imagine if Nancy decided that for one week you couldn’t access any social networking sites. Would you read a book? Would you get off your ass and exercise?

I’d just grab my laptop and get the fuck off this campus. Let’s be serious, the only reason I even saw this story is because it popped up on my Twitter timeline.

~Dee Lockett