Posts Tagged ‘high school’

This winter break provides many opportunities to do things you have never done before. So instead of just hanging out with friends from high school, I suggest you take in the sights and landmarks of your hometown. For instance, visit your local Occupy movement. I know many of the encampments have been torn down by local authorities, but in many cities there is a small residual force screaming at the top of their lungs about being the 99 percent.

Last year I visited my old high school, with the wrong intentions. This year I am going to do a complete 180. I will visit my old stomping grounds but not on such a  happy note; this time I will really let my school administration know how little they prepared me for college. This will of course get me removed from school property by the two obese security guards that only move when they go outside to smoke cigarettes across the street from the school entrance alongside the wannabe beatniks.

As every workplace prepares their holiday party, crash the one at your parents’ office by spiking the really cheap holiday punch. Not only will you get a kick out of this but so will your parents because they would love to tell their jackass boss how much they hate him or her without the fear of their boss actually remembering it.  This way there will be no repercussions following their tirade. Whatever you do over the break, have a good time. You do not have to attend lectures or recitations and I think that is a break we all deserve.

Let Jerk know what your plans are for winter break!

-Brysan Brown

Congrats to Dylan Lustig and Taylor Carr for running two great campaigns. Dylan Lusig won the election, and it was hard not to know that he was running for the presidency of Student Association. While reaching for a napkin at Ernie Davis last month, I saw Lustig’s face on the side of the napkin dispenser and my newsfeed on Facebook has been flooded with reminders to vote for him.

His campaign did bring a lot of attention to Student Association, but after attending a SA meeting last week, I was left disappointed by our school’s student governing body. Last Monday, the association debated for nearly 45 minutes about allowing a student cultural society to hold an event entirely in Mandarin. SA has even denied JERK its funding because of a human error concerning scheduling.

Neal Casey, the current Student association president seems to be in love with his gavel, having banged it several times when he was not happy about the direction the debate was going. At one point I turned to a person sitting next to me and said, “This is intense, man.”

This is only one meeting that I attended and cannot say that this is how all the group’s meetings take place, but it was disappointing to see the high school style atmosphere. In my interview with Dylan Lustig last month he said there was not much interaction between the group and the student body and one can see why. I hope Lustig accomplishes all of his goals and brings the changes he wants to SA, but I will not call him “Mr. President.”

-Brysan Brown

There is always that awkward, strange kid from back in high school who just couldn’t fit in.

“The Perks of Being a Wallflower” is a tale of one boy’s coming of age that’s honest and graced with a clean, direct writing style. The chapters always open with “Dear Friend,” as the book is written in letter format, from Charlie to an anonymous friend. This is a story about Charlie and his quest towards manhood. It chronicles the ups and downs of an overly smart boy set in the middle of a whirlpool of stereotypical high school drama.

Charlie is, often, a little too goody-two-shoes. His curiosity of the world makes the read much more intriguing and insightful. Stephen Chbosky’s writing style makes one become so engrossed in Charlie’s world that it becomes difficult to remember whether it’s fiction or not. It layers the importance of bonding and the relevance of “driving at night to your first real party as it begins to rain.” High school memories aren’t often the fondest, but readers can all relate to that first football game, falling in love, and a first real high school party.

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