Posts Tagged ‘Greek life’

Dylan Lustig, a sophomore international and economics major, and Taylor Carr, a junior public relations major, are both vying for the position of Student Association President. While both candidates will instantly inform you that they are friendly and cordial with each other, they disagree on policy and the direction of SA. For instance, many students do not know what SA is and its role on campus, and both candidates have sharply different views on how to fix this.

Carr believes a heavier emphasis on communication will lead to more awareness of SA. “We’ve had a really lackluster public relations effort since January,” Carr said. Lustig, meanwhile, agrees with Carr on the issue of communications and marketing of SA, but strongly believes SA should change its name from Student Association to Student Government Association. On the other hand, Carr disagrees with this name change. “It’s not about changing the name, it’s about how we reach out to students,” he said.

Whether SA changes its name or attempts to reach out to more students, it will have a difficult time acquiring the attention of an unaware and, at times, oblivious student body that does not know much about the inner workings of its university or student leadership.

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After being on campus for only a couple months, it is clear to me, a freshman, who runs Syracuse University. But, then again, it’d be just as clear to a detached and completely uninterested bystander because it’s that obnoxiously apparent. It’s not the world-class professors, the generous alumni, the smarty-pants Newhouse students, or even the famous Division I athletes. Instead, it’s the “sisters” and “brothers” of the school.

Those who participate in Greek life here at Syracuse are at the top of the totem pole, and they are not discrete in proving this. Walking through the SU campus is like taking a lap around the “It’s a Small World After All” Disneyland ride, our student body is just that diverse. There is, however, one thread of commonality that’s visible on the ‘Cuse campus–an aspect of college culture, made obvious by its loyal society members: letters.

Big, flashy, printed, sneering letters–in Greek, of course. These letters of the Ancient Greek alphabet are used to mark the dozens of different fraternities and sororities here in the 315, and are seemingly everywhere on campus. They are staring you in the face as you make your way to class or grab a bite to eat, a brutal, stuck-up and unfair reminder that whoever has those letters plastered on his or her chest is part of an elite association that you are not a part of.

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