Posts Tagged ‘Georgia’

Originally, I was going to make this about how the only time you hear about violent extremism, it is almost always right-wing ‘patriots’ who seem to think that bigotry, hatred and violence are the most American thing since apple pie. Unfortunately, the douchebag Occupy Oakland vandals decided to piss all over that for me. But regardless, their petty acts of vandalism pale in comparison to the level of violence planned in Georgia by a group of right-wing geriatrics that I will loathsomely dub ‘Faketriots.’

Apparently, these Faketriots decided they had enough of government intervention, all likely while being on Social Security and Medicare, and decided that it was time to heave themselves off their hemorrhoid doughnuts, take a beta blocker and after Bingo, plot a little domestic terrorism.

"Sorry, can't watch "Price Is Right" with you. I've got plans..."

It’s getting harder and harder these days for a kid to make a buck or two, and it just got that much harder. Recently in Georgia, a police officer barred three teenage girls from selling lemonade. His excuse: they did not have a business license or the correct forms. If the girls were to get the required forms, it would have cost them $50/day for each permit; they needed three.
 
The girls have since been forced to shut down the shop and look for an alternative way to save up money for their water park trip. Lemonade stands keep kids from getting bored in the summer. What else are they supposed to do if they are not making crappy lemonade and trying to sell it to strangers walking by? Perhaps, if they had a snack, say a donut, to go along with their refreshing lemonade, the officer might have cut them some slack.
 
-Nicole Fisher

Did I do that?

Posted: April 11, 2011 by jerkmag in VAULT -- archives
Tags: , , ,

Hayastan Shakarian, a 75-year old Georgian woman, lives in the poverty-stricken village of Armazi. She scavenges for scrap metal, and uses her meager earnings to sustain herself. Currently, however, she is involved in a cross-national controversy regarding the Internet.

Shakarian was searching for scrap metal recently when she was cut by what she thought was any old cable. Unfortunately for her, it happened to be a fiber-optic cable linking Georgia to Armenia. The cable provides 90 percent of Armenians with Internet access. For more than twelve harrowing hours, the vast majority of Armenians experienced a world devoid of the Internet (it is not clear yet how many actually survived the calamity, though the prediction is grim). (more…)