Porn, Poetry and Pyrotechnical Language

Posted: September 14, 2011 by jerkmag in BLOGS WE LIKE, CRISP -- health, VAULT -- archives
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“Lolita” by Vladimir Nabokov

I’ve wanted to read this book ever since I heard Throw Me the Statue’s song, “Lolita.” I didn’t look into the meaning until I read the summary of the actual novel. A story about an old guy who’s obsessively in love with a child? Uh…not so interested. But then, I read the first paragraph:

“Lolita, light of my life, fire of my loins. My sin, my soul. Lo-lee-ta: the tip of the tongue taking a trip of three steps down the palate to tap, at three, on the teeth. Lo. Lee. Ta.”

“Lolita” is about a pedophile named Humbert Humbert, a middle-aged college professor who has a fetish for young girls known as ‘nymphets.’ Yup, just a little more scandalous than having sex on a roof. Humbert finds himself lodging in the home of a lonely widow, Charlotte Haze, and her 12-year-old daughter, Dolores. His fetish becomes an unhealthy, sick obsession when Dolores, his ‘Lolita,’ turns into the subject of his fantasies. This is a story about his forbidden love affair, which ultimately leads to his psychological demise.

Nabokov brings Humbert’s obsession to life as he tells of Humbert’s chilling desires and drug-like needs. I never would have guessed that English is Nabokov’s second language; it’s such an accomplishment to be fluent in another language and even more of a success to write such a beautiful novel, especially when the storyline is considered blasphemous.

Although the book dragged a bit in the middle as Nabokov described every detail of the “couple’s” cross-country trip, the ending made everything worthwhile. Yeah, it’s illegal, and it still gives me the creeps, but really…is it really okay that love is blind in every way?

– Vania Myers

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Comments
  1. […] in the book reveal the artists’ deepest fears, darkest desires, shameful regrets and craziest obsessions. There are some we might look down on (“His wife doesn’t know he gave me this card AND an […]

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