Where Irish Eyes are Smiling

Posted: March 5, 2009 by kmahern in Uncategorized
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Outside Coleman’s Authentic Irish Pub, there stand two red phone booths – one regular, and one leprechaun-size. You’ll also find a door just for leprechauns to the right of the main entrance.

Leprechauns are people too...

Leprechauns are people too...

Still not convinced on the “authentic” claim? Step inside, and you’ll find yourself instantly transported to the other side of the pond. The pub boasts intricately etched glass windows at every corner, dark wood furnishings, and more Celtic decorations than you’ve ever seen – and I mean that in a good way. Add some Flogging Molly in the background and it all comes together to give this place the cozy, friendly feel you can only get from your favorite pub (Ah, The Victory, I remember it well).

You’ll find Guinness on tap, of course, along with Smithwick’s, Harp Lager, Killian’s, and Coleman’s infamous green beer. Yup, it’s really green. How Irish can you get?

Here are the stats on my favorite Irish brews before the celebration of beer begins.

Guinness: Black silk in a glass. This is the king of Irish beers and not for the faint-hearted. It’s almost a meal in itself, so try one or two pints with the beef stew or another lighter meal. What the heck, order the corned beef and cabbage – I’m willing to bet it’s the best you’ll get this side of Dublin.

 

Guinness (Left) and Smithwick's (Right)

Guinness (Left) and Smithwick's (Right)

Smithwick’s (pronounced Smittick’s): From the makers of Guinness, this one’s a bit easier to get through, but thick enough to keep the Natty Light worshippers at bay. It’s a dark, balanced brew sure to warm you up on a cold winter’s – or spring’s – day.

 

 

The design on the back door of Coleman's represents the traffic light the city of Syracuse installed not far from the pub in the 1920s, when the Irish youth rebelled against the original light, which had the British red above the Irish green

The design on the back door of Coleman's represents the traffic light the city of Syracuse installed not far from the pub in the 1920s, when the Irish youth rebelled against the original light, which had the British red above the Irish green

Green Beer: A testament to the fact that you don’t have to be Irish to enjoy St. Patty’s Day. After my boyfriend ordered it and began singing its praises, I asked the bartender where exactly it comes from. I had visions of green, white, and orange planes filled with kegs, delivering the stuff straight from the Motherland. “I think they brew it with Coors Light,” he replied. My taste buds confirmed the news. So while it won’t put that ruddy glow in your cheeks, this one can make us all feel a bit more Irish. And there’s nothing wrong with that.

 

If you’re planning a St. Patty’s Day visit, be prepared for the crowds. One fellow at the bar said there’s a line out the door starting at 6 a.m. Though we can assume some exaggeration due to his BAC, I doubt he’s too far off. Another complained that they’re not legally allowed to serve alcohol until 8 a.m., even on a holiday. Shucks, guess that means you’ll have to do some pregaming (kidding…).

Cheers!

Kaitlin

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